Grammar Lesson 6: EXPRESSING CONDITIONS IN ADVERB CLAUSES: IF-CLAUSES


Just another part of the lesson series by the name of “ADVERB CLAUSES”.

In this post I prepared a lesson on the subject of “EXPRESSING CONDITIONS IN ADVERB CLAUSES”.

Also I placed a set of exercises to help you understand the grammar lesson. Have fun!

EXPRESSING CONDITIONS IN ADVERB CLAUSES:

IF-CLAUSES

(a)    If it rains, the streets get wet.
If-clauses (also called “adverb clauses of condition”) present possible conditions. The main clause expresses results.
In (a): POSSIBLE CONDITION = it rains
RESULT = the streets get wet
(b)   If it rains tomorrow, I will take my umbrella.
A present tense, not a future tense, is used in an if-clause even though the verb in the if-clause may refer to a future event or situation, as in (b).
WORDS THAT INTRODUCE ADVERB CLAUSES OF CONDITION (IF-CLAUSES) 

If                                                                 in case                                               unless

Whether or not                                         in the event that                              only if

Even if

Exercises:

It may be cold tomorrow.

  • If it’s cold tomorrow, I’m going to stay home.
  • If it’s cold tomorrow, let’s go skating.
  • If it’s cold tomorrow, you should wear your wool sweater.
  • We can’t go on a picnic if it’s cold tomorrow.
  1. Maybe it will be hot tomorrow.
  2. Maybe you will have some free time tomorrow.
  3. Maybe you will lock yourself out of your apartment.
  4. Maybe the sun will be shining when you get up tomorrow morning.
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LEVM 2 (The second part of a movie)


The second part of the Season1 Episode 1 of the Friends series

You can download the second part of the movie from here

Also you can click on the link below:

http://www.mediafire.com/?04hif8db0dj3jo9

First watch the movie at least two times in a row.

Then try to write down the dialogues which actors and actresses use.

Next try to compare your transcription with the real text which I placed in here. And follow the structure that I told you in the post by the name of “Teaching English through movies”.

I assure you this method makes your perfect just needs to practice. Memorizing the words in this method is so easy and also practical because you see simultaneously the scene and also the where you are allowed to use that word.

  1. Continue reading
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Grammar Lesson 5 : SHOWING DIRECT CONTRAST: WHILE AND WHEREAS


Hello dear viewers

I want to put another post about the Adverb Clauses. I need your idea about what you think. Are these posts are helpful? Do you like these posts about grammar lesson and need more or not?

SHOWING DIRECT CONTRAST: WHILE AND WHEREAS
(a)     Mary is rich, while John is poor. 

(b)     John is poor, while Mary is rich.

(c)     Mary is rich, whereas John is poor.

(d)     Whereas Mary is rich, John is poor.

While and whereas are used to show direct contrast: “this” is exactly the opposite of “that” While and whereas may be used with the idea of either clause with no difference in meaning. Whereas mostly occurs in formal written English. 

Note: A comma is usually used even if the adverb clause comes second.

COMPARE 

(e)    While I was studying, the phone rang

While is also used in time clauses and means “during the time ”

 

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Grammar Lesson 4: Expressing Contrast (Unexpected Result)


Hello viewers. I hope you do well wherever you are. In this post I provide another grammar lesson along with other grammar lessons on the subject of Adverb Clauses.

In this lesson I give you more examples to rehearse and memorize each grammar part.

EXPRESSING CONTRAST (UNEXPECTED RESULT): USING EVEN THOUGH
(a)    Because the weather was cold, I didn’t go swimming.
(b)   Even though the weather was cold, I went swimming.
(c)    Because I wasn’t tired, I didn’t go to bed.
(d)   Even though I wasn’t tired, I went to bed.
Because is used to express expected results.
Even though is used to express unexpected results.

Even though means despite the fact that and is a more emphatic version of though and although.

Note: Like Because, even though introduces an adverb clause.
    Even though he’s 86, he has excellent health
    Even though she hasn’t really got the time, she still offered to help
    Even though he lost his job as Arts Minister, he continued to serve in the government.
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Grammar Lesson 3 : USING ADVERB CLAUSES TO SHOW CAUSE AND EFFECT


As I mentioned in the last post I want to prepare nine posts on the subject of “Adverb Clauses” and now I organize the second post of that series.

In this post you can see the way of using “because”, “now that” and “since” and you can use them in your sentences. Continue reading

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Grammar Lesson 2: “Adverb Clauses”


Hello dear partners.

If you are studying for a TOEFL or IELTS exam or would like to pass a writing test or interested in progressing in your writing, you should be aware of using adverb clauses in your texts for some reasons:

First it makes your writing clear and creative.

Also, it helps you to use correct grammar and know about the punctuation rules which will make your writing nice.

I want to provide nine grammar lessons on the subject of adverb clauses. Read them carefully and try to use them in your writing until you get a natural feeling about adverb clauses.

I really enjoy when I read your comments. Thank you and have fun! Continue reading

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Grammar Lesson 1 : “Paired Conjunctions”


In this post I provide a grammar lesson about “paired conjunctions” and I think it’s useful for your writing and also speaking as well.

At least it worked for me. Read it carefully and tell me your idea about it.

PAIRED CONJUNCTIONS: BOTH . . . AND; NOT  ONLY . . . BUT  ALSO; EITHER . . . OR; NEITHER . . . NOR
(a) Both my mother and my sister are here
(b) Not only my mother but also my sister is here
(c) Not only my sister but also my parents are here
(d) Neither my mother nor my sister is here
(e) Neither my sister nor my parents are here
Two subjects connected by both . . . and take a plural verb, as in (a).
When two subjects are connected by not only . . . but also, either . . . or, or neither . . . nor, the subject that is closer to the verb determines whether the verb is singular or plural.
(f) The research project will take both time and money
(g) Yesterday it not only rained but (also) snowed.
(h) I’ll take either chemistry or physics next quarter.
(i) That book is neither interesting nor accurate.
Notice the parallel structure in the examples. The same grammatical form should follow each part of the paired conjunctions.
In (f): both + noun + and + noun
In (g): not only + verb + but also + verb
In (h): either + noun + or + noun
In (i): neither + adjective + nor + adjective
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